Google android sdk


SDK Tools Release Notes | Android Studio

Android SDK Tools is a component for the Android SDK. It includes the complete set of development and debugging tools for Android. It is included with Android Studio.

Revisions

The sections below provide notes about successive releases of the SDK Tools, as denoted by revision number. To ensure you have the latest version, check SDK Manager for updates.

SDK Tools, Revision 26.0.2 (April 2017)

Changes:
  • When creating an AVD with avdmanager, it is no longer necessary to specify --tag if the package specified by --package only contains a single image (as is the case for all images currently distributed by Google).

SDK Tools, Revision 26.0.1 (March 2017)

Changes:
  • Hierarchy Viewer and Pixel Perfect tools returned to Android Device Monitor (the command-line versions are still removed, as of revision 25.3.0)

SDK Tools, Revision 26.0.0 (March 2017)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-Tools revision 24 or later.
Changes:
  • tools/android now attempts to reproduce the functionality of android in tools prior to version 25.3.0 by invoking the new tools.
    • All avd, target, and device commands should work as before.
    • sdk commands will be translated to similar commands using tools/bin/sdkmanager on a best-effort basis.
  • tools/bin/avdmanager now supports the list target command.

SDK Tools, Revision 25.3.0 (March 2017)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-Tools revision 24 or later.
Changes:
  • Android Emulator is removed from this package and moved to a different SDK directory. See the new Android Emulator Release Notes. This change is backward compatible with older Android Studio versions.
  • android avd command-line functionality replaced with new avdmanager tool.
  • Obsolete/deprecated tools have been removed:
  • Executables have been moved to bin/:
    • jobb
    • lint
    • monkeyrunner
    • screenshot2
    • Uiautomatorviewer
  • Enhanced sdkmanager:
    • View and accept all licenses from the command line
    • Improved verbose-mode package list

SDK Tools, Revision 25.2.5 (January 2017)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-Tools revision 24 or later.
Android Emulator bug fixes:
  • Fixed a crash on async socket reconnect.
  • Fixed a crash on Mac when glDeleteTextures() is called after the corresponding context was destroyed.

SDK Tools, Revision 25.2.4 (December 2016)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 24 or later.
Android Emulator bug fixes:
  • Fixed a crash in gles pipe when accessing a closed one.
  • Fixed a rare crash if emulator is closed during location loading.

SDK Tools, Revision 25.2.3 (November 2016)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 24 or later.
Added new sdkmanager command line tool to view, install, update, and uninstall individual Android SDK packages. New Android Emulator features and bug fixes:
  • Fixed -gpu guest (issue 227447).
  • Added support for WebP image decoding.
  • Added support for ETC2 texture decompression.

SDK Tools, Revision 25.2.2 (September 2016)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 23 or later.
New Android Emulator features:
  • Added new Virtual Sensors and Cellular > Signal Strength extended controls.
  • Added an LTE option to the Cellular > Network type extended controls.
  • Added simulated vertical swipes for scrolling through vertical menus with a mouse wheel.

SDK Tools, Revision 25.1.6 (May 2016)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 23 or later.
General Notes:
  • To improve the security of the Android Emulator and to address a reported security vulnerability, the Android Emulator Console now requires authentication before you can enter commands. Enter the auth auth_token command after you telnet to an emulator instance. auth_token must match the contents of the .emulator_console_auth_token file in your home directory.

SDK Tools, Revision 25.0.0 (April 2016)

Android Emulator 2.0:
  • Performance improvements:
    • Emulator now uses CPU acceleration on x86 emulator system images by default.
    • Added SMP support to take advantage of host multi-core architecture when emulating Android 6.0 (API level 23) or higher, resulting in much better performance and speed than the physical counterpart. Also with SMP support, you can test apps that specifically target multi-core Android devices.
    • Improved data and APK push-pull protocol between the Android Debug Bridge and devices running Android 5.0 (API level 21) or higher. See speed improvements up to five times faster than using a physical device.
  • Extended UI controls and a floating toolbar provide easy access to features previously available only through the command line, such as taking screen captures, adjusting the battery level, rotating the screen, and managing virtual calls.
  • Upload KML and GPX files to play back a set of custom location points.
  • Dynamically resize the emulator by dragging a corner or zoom into the emulator window.
  • Install APKs or add media files to the emulator’s internal SD card by dragging and dropping files into the emulator window.
  • Simulate multi-touch input. While interacting with the emulator screen, enter multi-touch mode by holding down the Ctrl key on Windown/Linux, or Command key on Mac OSX.
  • The Android Emulator works best with Android Studio 2.0. To find out more about what's included in the newest version of the official Android IDE, read the release notes.
  • Read the documentation to find out more about using the Android Emulator.

SDK Platform-tools, Revision 23.1.0 (December 2015)

General Notes:
  • Changed Linux requirements for Android SDK Platform-tools revision 23.1.0 and later: it now requires 64-bit Linux.

SDK Tools, Revision 24.4.1 (October 2015)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 23 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed a problem where the emulator title bar was hidden off screen. (Issue 178344)
  • Enabled the emulator to resize the user data partition by including e2fsprogs binaries. (Issue 189030)
  • Fixed a regression on the 32-bit Windows OS where the emulator fails to boot Android 6.0 (API level 23) through Android 5.0 (API level 21) system images. (Issue 188326)

SDK Tools, Revision 24.4.0 (October 2015)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 23 or later.
General Notes:
  • Updated the emulator so it can display an upgrade notification when a new version is available.
  • Added the ability for the emulator to send basic crash reports. You must opt-in through Android Studio preferences to enable crash report transmission.

SDK Tools, Revision 24.3.4 (August 2015)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 23 or later.
General Notes:
  • Added support for Android 6.0 (API level 23) platform.
Emulator:
  • Improved emulator performance on multi-core Windows desktops. (Issue 101040)
  • Added support for GPU emulation on Windows and Linux platforms using the -gpu mesa command line option.
  • Enabled support for running emulators with GPU emulation through remote desktop services, including Chrome Remote Desktop, Windows Terminal Services, and NoMachine.
  • Added support for emulators with 280 dpi and 360 dpi screen resolutions.
  • Improved support for GLES 2.0 extensions.
  • Fixed several issues with GPU emulation support.
  • Added support for setting the storage size on emulators using Android 4.4 (API level 19) and higher. (Issue 75141)
  • Fixed problem with sending long SMS messages between emulators. (Issue 3539)
  • Fixed issue with emulator getting incorrect time from location objects. (Issue 27272)
  • Added handling for unusual characters in paths and file names when starting emulators. (Issue 35889)

SDK Tools, Revision 24.3.3 (June 2015)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed issues with using Ant build tasks with the Eclipse ADT build structure.
  • Fixed the emulator boot problem on Mac OS X 10.8.5.

SDK Tools, Revision 24.3.2 (June 2015)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed issues with the ARM 64-bit emulator.

SDK Tools, Revision 24.3.1 (June 2015)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed issue with the root/ and lib/ folders.

Caution: This release is known to contain issues which prevent builds from completing. We strongly recommend that you update to SDK Tools 24.3.2 as soon as possible.

SDK Tools, Revision 24.3.0 (June 2015)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed several minor emulator issues.

Caution: This release is known to contain issues which prevent builds from completing. We strongly recommend that you update to SDK Tools 24.3.2 as soon as possible.

SDK Tools, Revision 24.2.0 (May 2015)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed several minor emulator issues.

SDK Tools, Revision 24.1.2 (February 2015)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed boot failures of MIPS system images on Mac OS X.
  • Fixed AVD screen capture issues when using GPU emulation.
  • Fixed memory leaks in emulator system.

SDK Tools, Revision 24.0.2 (December 2014)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed issue with creating projects and activities from templates using Eclipse ADT.

SDK Tools, Revision 24.0.1 (December 2014)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed Java detection issue on 32-bit Windows systems.

SDK Tools, Revision 24.0.0 (December 2014)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
General Notes:
  • Added support for Android Studio 1.0 and emulator enhancements.

SDK Tools, Revision 23.0.5 (October 2014)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 23.0.4 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 23.0.4.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed Windows 32-bit compilation issue.

SDK Tools, Revision 23.0.4 (October 2014)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 23.0.4 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 23.0.4.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed duplicate devices in AVD for Wear and TV.

SDK Tools, Revision 23.0.2 (July 2014)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 23.0.2 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 23.0.2.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Added ProGuard .bat files that were missing.
  • Added the proguard-android.txt file that was missing.
  • Renamed the lombok-ast-0.2.2.jar file to lombok-ast.jar, which should allow running lint from the command line.

SDK Tools, Revision 23.0.0 (June 2014)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 23.0.0 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 23.0.0.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Added the Android Wear tools and system images.

SDK Tools, Revision 22.6.4 (June 2014)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 18 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 22.6.3 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 22.6.3.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed an issue with the x86 emulator that caused Google Maps to crash. (Issue 69385)
  • Fixed minor OpenGL issues.

SDK Tools, Revision 22.6.3 (April 2014)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 18 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 22.6.3 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 22.6.3.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed a problem where the AVD manager allowed creating Android Wear virtual devices with a target API Level lower than 19.
  • Fixed the description of Android Wear system images in the SDK Manager.
Known Issues:

When you create an Android Wear virtual device in the AVD manager, a target API Level lower than 19 may be selected by default. Make sure you select the target API Level 19 when creating Android Wear virtual devices.

SDK Tools, Revision 22.6.2 (March 2014)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 18 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 22.6.2 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 22.6.2.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed a problem where the SDK Manager threw a NullPointerException after removing a virtual device that was created using the Android Wear system image. (Issue 67588)
  • Fixed a problem with Nexus 5 Android virtual devices created from the command line where the SD card file system was read-only.

SDK Tools, Revision 22.6.1 (March 2014)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 18 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 22.6.1 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 22.6.1.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed a problem where the Android Virtual Device Manager could not create new virtual devices. (Issue 66661)
  • Fixed a problem with virtual devices created using ADT 22.3 or earlier.

    If you created an Android Virtual Device using ADT 22.3 or earlier, the AVD may be listed as broken in the AVD Manager in 22.6.1. To fix this problem, select the virtual device on the AVD Manager and click Repair.

  • Fixed a problem with the command line tools when creating virtual devices. (Issue 66740)
  • Fixed a problem with the command line lint script.
Known Issues:

When you create an Android virtual device using the Nexus 5 device definition, you must enable the Use Host GPU option, otherwise the virtual device will not start.

SDK Tools, Revision 22.6 (March 2014)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 18 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 22.6.0 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 22.6.0.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • The command line lint script (tools\lint.bat on Windows platforms, tools/lint on other platforms) and the lint target on ant builds fail with the following error:

    Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: lombok/ast/AstVisitor

    As a temporary workaround, rename the file tools\lib\lombok-ast-0.2.2.jar to tools\lib\lombok-ast.jar. We will release an updated version of the tools with a fix for this issue as soon as possible.

  • Added support for Java 7 language features like multi-catch, try-with-resources, and the diamond operator. These features require version 19 or higher of the Build Tools. Try-with-resources requires minSdkVersion 19; the rest of the new language features require minSdkVersion 8 or higher.
  • Added new lint checks:
    • Security:
      • Look for code potentially affected by a SecureRandom vulnerability.
      • Check that calls to checkPermission use the return value.
    • Check that production builds do not use mock location providers.
    • Look for manifest values that are overwritten by values from Gradle build scripts.
  • Fixed a number of minor issues in the SDK and build system.
  • Emulator:
    • Fixed a problem with the emulator shutting down immediately for Android 1.5 on the Nexus One and Nexus S devices. (Issue 64945)
    • Fixed a problem with port numbers longer than four digits. (Issue 60024)
    • Fixed battery errors for the Nexus One and Nexus S devices. (Issue 39959)
    • Fixed a problem with paths or arguments that contain spaces on Windows platforms. (Issue 18317)
    • Fixed a problem with long path values on Windows platforms. (Issue 33336)
    • Fixed a problem with the -snapshot-list command line option on 64-bit systems. (Issue 34233)
  • Fixed an issue with RenderScript support. Using RenderScript support mode now requires version 19.0.3 of the Build Tools.

SDK Tools, Revision 22.3 (October 2013)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 18 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 22.3.0 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 22.3.0.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Added support for Android 4.4 (API level 19).
  • Fixed a number of minor bugs in the SDK and build system.

SDK Tools, Revision 22.2.1 (September 2013)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 16 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 22.2.1 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 22.2.1.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed problem with templates that causes the new project wizard to hang. (Issue 60149)
  • Fixed crash when using the lint command line tool because of mis-matched library dependency. (Issue 60190)

SDK Tools, Revision 22.2 (September 2013)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 16 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 22.2 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 22.2.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Updated build tools to allow use of RenderScript on older versions of Android using new features in the Support Library.
  • Moved the Systrace tool to the >sdk</platform-tools/ directory.
  • Modified Tracer for OpenGL ES to support OpenGL ES 3.0.
  • Lint
    • Fixed problem with lint not detecting custom namespaces. (Issue 55673)
    • Fixed problem with the XML report including invalid characters. (Issue 56205)
    • Fixed command-line execution of lint to work in headless mode to support execution by build servers. (Issue 55820)
  • Improved support for path names with spaces in the Windows command-line tools.

SDK Tools, Revision 22.0.5 (July 2013)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 16 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with the ADT Plugin, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 22.0.5 and later. If you haven't already, update ADT to 22.0.5.
  • This version of the SDK Tools is designed to work with Android Studio 0.2.x and later.
  • If you are developing without an integrated development environment (IDE), you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed RenderScript compilation issue for Windows platforms with ant.
  • Updated Systrace to work with the Android 4.3 platform image.
  • Fixed packaging of RenderScript compiler.
  • Build tools 18.0.0 is obsolete and 18.0.1 should be used instead.

SDK Tools, Revision 22.0.4 (July 2013)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 16 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with the ADT Plugin, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 22.0.4 and later. If you haven't already, update ADT to 22.0.4.
  • This version of the SDK Tools is designed to work with Android Studio 0.2.x and later.
  • If you are developing without an integrated development environment (IDE), you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed problem with compiling RenderScript code.

SDK Tools, Revision 22.0.1 (May 2013)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 16 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 22.0.1 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 22.0.1.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Fixed issue with Lint ServiceCast check and fully qualified class names. (Issue 55403)
  • Fixed crash issue with Lint ArraySizeDetector check. (Issue 54887)
  • Fixed a problem with the monkeyrunner tool failing to import standard python classes. (Issue 55632)
  • Fixed a problem with DDMS monitor not opening heap and network statistics views due to a class not found exception. (Issue 55394)

SDK Tools, Revision 22 (May 2013)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 16 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 22.0.0 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 22.0.0.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Changed the structure of the SDK by adding a new build tool SDK Component, which is based on the existing platform-tools component. This change decouples the build tools versions from the IDE versions, allowing updates to the tools without requiring an IDE update.
  • Updated tools to allow libraries to share the same package name as the applications that use them.
  • Updated draw9patch tool to allow easier changing of markers.
  • Added new Lint checks, including checks for layout consistency, RelativeLayout siblings, Parcel creator, JavaScript interfaces, Service casting, quantity strings, manifest typos, orientation tags in layouts, overlapping names for 9-patches and images, and class existence checks.
  • Updated build tools to sign applications using the BouncyCastle library instead of relying on Sun JVM specific APIs.
  • Released some of the Android tools into Maven Central to assist third-party tool developers. The following tools are available in the repository: manifest-merger, common/sdk_common, ddmlib, dvlib, layoutlib_api, sdklib, and lint.
Bug fixes:
  • Fixed a number of minor bugs in the SDK and build system.

SDK Tools, Revision 21.1 (February 2013)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 16 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 21.1.0 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 21.1.0.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Improved error reporting in dx when dex merging fails in the build system.
  • Added more than 15 new Lint checks, including checks for overriding older APIs, XML resource problems, graphic asset issues and manifest tags.
  • Added new aapt feature to compile resources.

SDK Tools, Revision 21.0.1 (December 2012)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 16 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 21.0.1 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 21.0.1.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Build
    • Updated build to detect and handle package name conflicts between an application and the libraries it depends on. Libraries cannot share package names unless all of them share the same package name. (Issue 40152, Issue 40273)
    • Added a flag to disable dex merging to deal with cases where merging could generate a broken dex file. If this happens to your project, add the following setting to your project.properties file: dex.disable.merger=true This setting causes the build system to revert to the older, slower dex processing that does not pre-dex libraries.
  • RenderScript
    • Added support for Filterscript compilation.
    • Added new project setting to control the RenderScript compilation target separately from an Android project. Adding the following line to a project.properties file causes RenderScript code to be compiled for Android API Level 17, while the containing application can target a different (lower) API level: renderscript.target = 17 Previously, the RenderScript compilation target was tied to the android:minSdkVersion setting in the manifest. (Issue 40487)
Bug fixes:
  • Lint
    • Corrected check for 0px values in style XML elements. (Issue 39601)
    • Fixed incorrect flagging of formatting strings. (Issue 39758)
    • Fixed problem where tools:ignore directive in the manifest file was ignored by the Lint tool. (Issue 40136)
    • Fixed problem with flagging a wakelock release inside a conditional. (Issue 40424)
    • Fixed incorrect reporting of missing layout_width and layout_height XML fields. (Issue 38958)
    • Fixed handling of custom namespace attributes.
    • Added fixes for filtering out library project warnings.
    • Removed warnings about missing classes before a build.
  • Fixed problem with UI Automator Viewer execution script where Android tools directory is not set.
  • Fixed problem with the SDK Manager so that it auto-selects the most recently released platform on startup.
  • Fixed Java finding script to look for the currently supported version of Java (1.6 or higher).
  • Fixed the SDK Manager launcher in the ADT bundle so that it can properly launch the SDK Manager program when it is placed at the root of the bundle.

SDK Tools, Revision 21 (November 2012)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 16 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 21.0.0 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 21.0.0.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
  • Build System
    • Added a flag that sets jumbo mode for DEX files, which allows a larger number of strings in the DEX files. Enable this mode by adding the following line to the project.properties file of your project: dex.force.jumbo=true
    • Improved the build time by pre-dexing libraries (both JAR files and library projects).
    • Updated the build to generate R resource classes for library projects with only the IDs needed by the libraries, reducing the risk of hitting DEX file limits for fields and methods.
    • Improved the build so that several editing features (code completion, resource chooser, go to declaration) properly handle library project resources.
  • Lint
    • Added over 25 new lint rules for resources, locale settings, layout files, incorrect use of SparseArray and PowerManager.WakeLock and manifest issues.
    • Updated reporting to include errors in library projects if the library project is in the list of projects to be checked.
    • Added a new lint target to the Ant build system for easier integration with continuous build systems.
    • Added new --sources and --classpath arguments to point to sources with different directory structures.
    • Improved the XML export function to support the Jenkins Lint plugin.
    • Added support for class file flow analysis.
  • Android Virtual Devices (AVD)
    • Added new Device Definitions tab in the AVD Manager for configuring standard size and Nexus virtual devices.
    • Improved emulators so that they launch with a skin that is dynamically generated and reflects the actual hardware configured in the AVD Manager.
    • Improved support for developing Android apps on MIPS-based devices with new MIPS System Images for Android Virtual Devices.
  • Added jobb tool for creating and encrypting APK Expansion Files. (more info)
  • Improved the Android JUnit test runner to allow a test to be run on all connected devices simultaneously.
Bug fixes:
  • Fixed manifest merger to properly adapt library classes in the merged manifest.

SDK Tools, Revision 20.0.3 (August 2012)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 12 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 20.0.3 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 20.0.3.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
Bug fixes:
  • Fixed problem with cached download lists in SDK Manager.

SDK Tools, Revision 20.0.1 (July 2012)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 12 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 20.0.1 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 20.0.1.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
Bug fixes:
  • Fixed wrong check on build state that forced repetitive Java code recompilation.
  • Fixed problems with running more than one emulator and running multiple emulators with GPU acceleration.
  • Improved resize algorithm for better rendering on scaled emulator windows.
  • Fixed a bug in the lint check for unprotected broadcast receivers to ignore unprotected receivers for default Android actions.
  • Fixed build issue for projects using RenderScript.
  • Fixed memory leak in the emulator.

SDK Tools, Revision 20 (June 2012)

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 12 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 20.0.0 and later. If you haven't already, we highly recommend updating your ADT Plugin to 20.0.0.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General notes:
  • Added new Device Monitor application, grouping Android debugging tools into a single application, including ddms, traceview, hierarchyviewer and Tracer for GLES. (more info)
  • Added new System Trace new tool for tracing Android system activity. This tool allow you to capture a slice of system activity, plus additional information tagged from the Settings > Developer Options > Monitoring: Enable traces or with specific calls added to your application code.
  • Build System
    • Added automatic merging of library project manifest files into the including project's manifest. Enable this feature with the manifestmerger.enabled property.
    • Added automatic ProGuard support for the aapt -G flag. This change causes the build system to generate a temporary ProGuard keep-rules file containing classes that are referenced from XML files (such as custom views) and pass this to ProGuard at shrink time. This can make the resulting APK much smaller when using just a small portion of a large library project (such as the Android Support library), since the catch-all rules to keep all custom views from the default ProGuard configuration file have also been removed.
    • Added two ProGuard configuration files for use in projects: proguard-android-optimize.txt which enables optimizations and proguard-android.txt which disables them.
  • SDK Manager
    • Improved caching to reduce downloading of repository definitions.
    • Added Tools > Manage Add-on Sites option to improve performance by allowing temporary deactivation of third-party sites if they are loading slowly.
    • Added settings for the SDK Manager download cache (SDK Manager > Tools > Options).
Bug fixes:
  • Build
    • Fixed problem where test projects did not have access to the full classpath of tested projects, including Library Projects and third-party jars.
    • Fixed deployment logic so that applications with embedded tests can now be deployed and tested like test applications, including code coverage information.
    • Fixed Ant support for testing projects with libraries.

SDK Tools, Revision 19 (April 2012)

Note: This update of SDK Tools is only available through the Android SDK Manager. Use this tool to download and install this update.

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 9 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 18.0.0 and later. If you haven't already, we highly recommend updating your ADT Plugin to 18.0.0.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
Bug fixes:
  • Fixed an issue that prevented some developers from running the emulator with GPU acceleration.

SDK Tools, Revision 18 (April 2012)

Important: To download the new Android 4.0 system components from the Android SDK Manager, you must first update the SDK tools to revision 14 or later and restart the Android SDK Manager. If you do not, the Android 4.0 system components will not be available for download.

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 9 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 18.0.0 and later. If you haven't already, we highly recommend updating your ADT Plugin to 18.0.0.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General notes:
  • Updated the SdkController app to encapsulate both sensor and multitouch emulation functionality.
Bug fixes:
  • Fixed Ant issues where some jar libraries in the libs/ folder are not picked up in some cases.

SDK Tools, Revision 17 (March 2012)

Important: To download the new Android 4.0 system components from the Android SDK Manager, you must first update the SDK tools to revision 14 or later and restart the Android SDK Manager. If you do not, the Android 4.0 system components will not be available for download.

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 9 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 17.0.0 and later. If you haven't already, we highly recommend updating your ADT Plugin to 17.0.0.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General notes:
  • Emulator
  • Added viewing of live detailed network usage of an app in DDMS. (more info)
  • ProGuard
    • Updated the bundled ProGuard tool to version 4.7. In addition to many new features, this update fixes the Conversion to Dalvik format failed with error 1 error some users have experienced.
    • Updated the default proguard.cfg file with better default flags for Android.
    • Split the ProGuard configuration file has been in half, with project specific flags kept in project and the generic Android flags distributed (and updated) with the tools themselves.
  • Build
    • Added a feature that allows you to run some code only in debug mode. Builds now generate a class called BuildConfig containing a DEBUG constant that is automatically set according to your build type. You can check the (BuildConfig.DEBUG) constant in your code to run debug-only functions.
    • Fixed issue when a project and its libraries include the same jar file in their libs folder. (more info)
    • Added support for custom views with custom attributes in libraries. Layouts using custom attributes must use the namespace URI http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto instead of the URI that includes the app package name. This URI is replaced with the app specific one at build time.
  • Lint
    • Updated Lint to check Android application code. Lint rules which previously performed pattern based searches in the application code (such as the unused resource check) have been rewritten to use the more accurate Java-style parse trees.
    • Added support for checking library projects. This change means that rules such as the unused resource check properly handle resources declared in a library project and referenced in a downstream project.
    • Added ability to suppress Lint warnings in Java code with the new @SuppressLint annotation, and in XML files with the new tools: namespace and ignore attribute. (more info)
    • New Lint checks:
      • Added check for Android API calls that require a version of Android higher than the minimum supported version. You can use the new @TargetApi annotation to suppress warnings when the code is wrapped in a system version condition. (more info)
      • Added over 20 new Lint rules, including checks for performance, XML layouts, manifest and file handling.

SDK Tools, Revision 16 (December 2011)

Important: To download the new Android 4.0 system components from the Android SDK Manager, you must first update the SDK tools to revision 14 or later and restart the Android SDK Manager. If you do not, the Android 4.0 system components will not be available for download.

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 9 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 16.0.0 and later. If you haven't already, we highly recommend updating your ADT Plugin to 16.0.0.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General notes:
  • Added Lint tools to detect common errors in Android projects. (more info)
  • Added sensor emulation support, which allows the emulator to read sensor data from a physical Android device. (more info)
  • Added support for using a webcam to emulate a camera on Mac OS X.
Bug fixes:

SDK Tools, Revision 15 (October 2011)

Important: To download the new Android 4.0 system components from the Android SDK Manager, you must first update the SDK tools to revision 14 or later and restart the Android SDK Manager. If you do not, the Android 4.0 system components will not be available for download.

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 9 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 15.0.0 and later. If you haven't already, we highly recommend updating your ADT Plugin to 15.0.0.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
Bug fixes:
  • Fixed emulator crash on Linux due to improper webcam detection (Issue 20952).
  • Fixed emulator issue when using the -wipe-data argument.
  • Fixed build issue when using RenderScript in projects that target API levels 11-13 (Issue 21006).
  • Fixed issue when creating an AVD using the GoogleTV addon (Issue 20963).
  • Fixed ant test (Issue 20979).
  • Fixed android update project (Issue 20535).
  • Fixed scrolling issue in the new Logcat panel of DDMS.
  • Fixed issue with MonkeyRunner (Issue 20964).
  • Fixed issues in the SDK Manager (Issue 20939, Issue 20607).

SDK Tools, Revision 14 (October 2011)

Important: To download the new Android 4.0 system components from the Android SDK Manager, you must first update the SDK tools to revision 14 and restart the Android SDK Manager. If you do not, the Android 4.0 system components will not be available for download.

Dependencies:
  • Android SDK Platform-tools revision 8 or later.
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 14.0.0 and later. If you haven't already, we highly recommend updating your ADT Plugin to 14.0.0.
  • If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General notes:
  • Added webcam support to Android 4.0 or later platforms to emulate rear-facing cameras when one webcam is present, and to emulate both rear-facing and front-facing cameras when two webcams are present. Webcam support is for Windows and Linux only. Mac support will come in a later release.
  • Changed default.properties to project.properties and build.properties to ant.properties. Any existing projects that you build with Ant must be updated with the android update project command.
  • Changed Ant build.xml file to support improvements to the build system and added and modified Ant commands to support these changes. For a list of Ant commands, see the Ant Command Reference.
  • Changed how library projects are built.
  • Improved incremental builds, so that resource compilation runs less frequently. Builds no longer run when you edit strings or layouts (unless you add a new id) and no longer run once for each library project.
  • Introduced a "PNG crunch cache" that only runs on modified PNG files, instead of crunching all existing PNG files, all the time.
  • Revamped the SDK Manager UI (more info).

For a complete overview of the build system changes and what you need to do to support them, see the Android Tools Project site.

SDK Tools, Revision 13 (September 2011)

Dependencies:

If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 12.0.0 and later. If you haven't already, we highly recommend updating your ADT Plugin to 12.0.0.

If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.

General notes:
  • Fix compilation issue in Ant (dex step) when paths have spaces.
  • Fix issue in emulator installation when paths have spaces.
  • Fix issue when AVD paths have spaces.
  • Fix rendering issue when using emulator scaling (see more).

SDK Tools, Revision 12 (July 2011)

Dependencies:

If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 12.0.0 and later. If you haven't already, we highly recommend updating your ADT Plugin to 12.0.0.

If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.

General notes:
  • The AVD manager and emulator can now use system images compiled for ARM v7 and x86 CPUs.

SDK Tools, Revision 11 (May 2011)

Dependencies:

If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 10.0.1 and later. If you haven't already, we highly recommend updating your ADT Plugin to 10.0.1.

If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.

General notes:
  • Miscellaneous emulator changes to support Android 3.1.

SDK Tools, Revision 10 (February 2011)

Dependencies:

If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 10.0.0 and later. After installing SDK Tools r10, we highly recommend updating your ADT Plugin to 10.0.0.

If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.

General notes:
  • The tools now automatically generate Java Programming Language source files (in the gen directory) and bytecode (in the res/raw directory) from your native .rs files

SDK Tools, Revision 9 (January 2011)

Dependencies:

If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 9.0.0 and later. After installing SDK Tools r9, we highly recommend updating your ADT Plugin to 9.0.0.

If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.

Upgrading to SDK Tools r9:

If you are upgrading to SDK Tools r9 from SDK Tools r7 or earlier, the default installed location for the adb tool has changed from <SDK>/tools/adb to <SDK>/platform-tools/adb. This means that you should add the new location to your PATH and modify any custom build scripts to reference the new location. Copying the adb executable from the new location to the old is not recommended, since subsequent updates to the SDK Tools will delete the file.

General notes:
  • The default ProGuard configuration, proguard.cfg, now ignores the following classes:
  • Ant lib rules now allow you to override java.encoding, java.source, and java.target properties.
  • The default encoding for the javac Ant task is now UTF-8.
  • The LogCat view in DDMS now properly displays UTF-8 characters.
  • The SDK Manager is more reliable on Windows. For details on the improvements, see the Android Tools Project Site.
  • Early look at the new snapshot feature: To improve startup time for the emulator, you can enable snapshots for the system state. The emulator will then restore to the state when it last closed almost instantly. Note: The snapshot feature is still under active development and might not always perform as expected.
  • Fixed the missing JAR file error that prevented draw9patch from running.
  • Fixed the Windows launch scripts hierarchyviewer and ddms to support the new location of adb.
  • Known issues with emulator performance: Because the Android emulator must simulate the ARM instruction set architecture on your computer, emulator performance is slow. We're working hard to resolve the performance issues and it will improve in future releases.

SDK Tools, Revision 8 (December 2010)

Dependencies:

If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 8.0.0 and later. After installing SDK Tools r8, we highly recommend updating your ADT Plugin to 8.0.0.

If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.

Also note that SDK Tools r8 requires a new SDK component called Platform-tools. The new Platform-tools component lets all SDK platforms (Android 2.1, Android 2.2, and so on) use the same (latest) version of build tools such as adb, aapt, aidl, and dx. To download the Platform-tools component, use the Android SDK Manager.

Upgrading from SDK Tools r7:

If you are upgrading to SDK Tools r8 from an earlier version, note that the the default installed location for the adb tool has changed from <SDK>/tools/adb to <SDK>/platform-tools/adb. This means that you should add the new location to your PATH and modify any custom build scripts to reference the new location. Copying the adb executable from the new location to the old is not recommended, since subsequent updates to the SDK Tools will delete the file.

General notes:
  • All SDK platforms now support Library Projects.
  • Support for a true debug build. Developers no longer need to add the android:debuggable attribute to the <application> tag in the manifest — the build tools add the attribute automatically. In Eclipse/ADT, all incremental builds are assumed to be debug builds, so the tools insert android:debuggable="true". When exporting a signed release build, the tools do not add the attribute. In Ant, a ant debug command automatically inserts the android:debuggable="true" attribute, while ant release does not. If android:debuggable="true" is manually set, then ant release will actually do a debug build, rather than a release build.
  • Automatic ProGuard support in release builds. Developers generate a ProGuard configuration file using the android tool — the build tools then automatically run ProGuard against the project sources during the build. For more information, see the ProGuard documentation.
  • New overridable Ant javac properties: java.encoding, java.source, and java.target (default values are "ascii", "1.5", and "1.5", respectively).
  • New UI for the HierarchyViewer tool.

SDK Tools, Revision 7 (September 2010)

Dependencies:

If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 0.9.8 and later. After installing SDK Tools r7, we highly recommend updating your ADT Plugin to 0.9.8.

General notes:
  • Added support for library projects that depend on other library projects.
  • Adds support for aidl files in library projects.
  • Adds support for extension targets in Ant build to perform tasks between the normal tasks: -pre-build, -pre-compile, and -post-compile.
  • Adds support for "headless" SDK update. See android -h update sdk for more information.
  • Fixes location control in DDMS to work in any locale not using '.' as a decimal point.

SDK Tools, Revision 6 (May 2010)

Dependencies:

If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 0.9.7 and later. After installing SDK Tools r6, we highly recommend updating your ADT Plugin to 0.9.7.

Library projects:

The SDK Tools now support the use of library projects during development, a capability that lets you store shared Android application code and resources in a separate development project. You can then reference the library project from other Android projects and, at build time, the tools compile the shared code and resources as part of the dependent applications. More information about this feature is available in the Creating and Managing Projects document.

If you are developing in Eclipse, ADT provides the equivalent library project support.

SDK Tools, Revision 5 (March 2010)

Dependencies:
  • If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 0.9.6 and later. After installing SDK Tools r5, we highly recommend updating your ADT Plugin to 0.9.6.
  • For Mac OS platforms, OS X 10.4.x (Tiger) is no longer officially supported.
SDK and AVD Manager:
  • Fixes SSL download for the standalone version of the SDK Updater.
  • Fixes issue with 64-bit JVM on Windows.
  • Adds support for platform samples components.
  • Improves support for dependency between components.
  • AVDs now sorted by API level.
  • The AVD creation dialog now enforces a minimum SD card size of 9MB.
  • Prevents deletion of running AVDs.
  • Settings are now automatically saved, no need to click "Apply".
Emulator:
  • Emulator now requires SD card to be 9MB or more.
Layoutopt:
  • Fixes layoutopt.bat to execute correctly on Windows.

SDK Tools, Revision 4 (December 2009)

Dependencies:

This version of SDK Tools is compatible with ADT 0.9.5 and later, but not compatible with earlier versions. If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, you must update your ADT plugin to version 0.9.5 or higher if you install SDK Tools r4 in your SDK.

General notes:
  • Launcher script now forces GDK_NATIVE_WINDOW=true (linux only), to fix a compatibility issue between GTK and SWT.
Android SDK and AVD Manager:
  • AVD Launch dialog now shows scale value.
  • Fixes potential NPE in SDK Manager on AVD launch, for older AVD with no skin name specified.
  • Fixes XML validation issue in on older Java versions.
  • No longer forces the use of Java 1.5 on Mac OS X.
Emulator:
  • No longer limits the size of the system partition.
Ant build tools:
  • .apk packaging now properly ignores vi swap files as well as hidden files.

SDK Tools, Revision 3 (October 2009)

Dependencies:

This version of SDK Tools is compatible with ADT 0.9.4 and later, but not compatible with earlier versions. If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, you must update your ADT plugin to version 0.9.4 or higher if you install SDK Tools r3 in your SDK.

Android tool:
  • Adds new android create test-project and android update test-project commands to allow for greater flexibility in the location of the main and test projects.
DDMS:
  • Adds a button to dump HPROF file for running applications (app must be able to write to the sdcard).
  • Button to start/stop profiling of a running application (app must be able to write to the sdcard). Upon stop, Traceview will automatically be launched to display the trace.
  • Fixed DDMS, Traceview, and the AVD Mananger/SDK Updater to run on Mac OS X 10.6.
  • Fixed screenshot support for devices running 32-bit framebuffer.
Android SDK and AVD Manager:
  • Provides a new UI that lets you set options for controlling the emulator skin, screen size/density, and scale factor used when launching an AVD.
  • Provides improved AVD creation UI, which lets you customize the hardware properties of your AVDs.
  • Now enforces dependencies between platforms and tools components, and between SDK add-ons and platforms.
Layoutopt, a new tool for optimizing layouts:

The SDK Tools r3 package includes layoutopt, a new command-line tool that helps you optimize your layout hierarchies. When run against your layout files, the tool analyzes their hierarchies and notifies you of inefficiencies and other potential issues. The tool also provides simple solutions for the issues it finds. For usage, see layoutopt.

developer.android.com

Update the IDE and SDK Tools

Once you install Android Studio, it's easy to keep the Android Studio IDE and Android SDK tools up to date with automatic updates and the Android SDK Manager.

Update Your IDE and Change Channels

Android Studio notifies you with a small bubble dialog when an update is available for the IDE, but you can manually check for updates by clicking Help > Check for Update (on Mac, Android Studio > Check for Updates).

Updates for Android Studio are available from the following release channels:

  • Canary Channel: These are bleeding-edge releases, updated roughly weekly, and available for download at developer.android.com/studio/preview.

    In addition to receiving canary versions of Android Studio, you will also receive preview versions of other SDK tools, including the Android Emulator.

    Although these builds are subject to more bugs, they do get tested and we want to offer them so you can try new features and provide feedback. This channel is not recommended for production development.

  • Dev Channel: These are hand-picked canary builds that survived a full round of internal testing.
  • Beta Channel: These are release candidates based on stable canary builds, released to get feedback before going into the stable channel.
  • Stable Channel: The official stable release that is available for download at developer.android.com/studio.

If you'd like to try one of the preview channels (Canary, Dev, or Beta) while still using the Stable build for your production Android projects, you can install both side by side.

To change the update channel for an existing install, proceed as follows:

  1. Open the Preferences window by clicking File > Settings (on Mac, Android Studio > Preferences).
  2. In the left panel, click Appearance & Behavior > System Settings > Updates.
  3. Be sure that Automatically check for updates is checked, then select a channel from the drop-down list (see figure 1).
  4. Click Apply or OK.

Figure 1. The Android Studio Updates preferences.

Update Your Tools with the SDK Manager

The Android SDK Manager helps you download the SDK tools, platforms, and other components you need to develop your apps. Once downloaded, you can find each package in the directory indicated as the Android SDK Location, shown in figure 2.

To open the SDK Manager from Android Studio, click Tools > Android > SDK Manager or click SDK Manager in the toolbar. If you're not using Android Studio, you can download tools using the sdkmanager command-line tool.

When an update is available for a package you already have, a dash appears in the check box next to the package.

  • To update an item or install a new one, click the check box so it shows a checkmark.
  • To uninstall a package, click to clear the check box.

Pending updates are indicated in the left column with a download icon . Pending removals are indicated with a red cross .

To update the selected packages, click Apply or OK, then agree to any license agreements.

Figure 2. The Android SDK Manager.

Recommended packages

You should give special consideration to the following tools in the SDK Tools tab:

Android SDK Build-Tools Required. Includes tools to build Android apps. See the SDK Build Tools Release Notes. Android SDK Platform-Tools Required. Includes various tools required by the Android platform, including the adb tool. Android SDK Tools Required. Includes essential tools such as ProGuard. See the SDK Tools Release Notes. Android Emulator Recommended. A QEMU-based device-emulation tool that you can use to debug and test your applications in an actual Android runtime environment. See the Android Emulator Release Notes.

Note: Most API libraries that were previously provided by the Support Repository packages (such as the Android Support Library, Constraint Layout, Google Play services, and Firebase) are now instead available from Google's Maven repository. Projects created with Android Studio 3.0 and higher automatically include this repository in the build configuration. If you're using an older project, you must manually add Google's Maven repository to your build.gradle file.

In the SDK Platforms tab, you must also install at least one version of the Android platform. Each version provides several different packages. To download only those that are required, click the check box next to the version name.

To see all available packages for each Android platform, click Show Package Details at the bottom of the window. Within each platform version, you'll find the following packages:

Android SDK Platform Required. At least one platform is required in your environment so you're able to compile your application. In order to provide the best user experience on the latest devices, use the latest platform version as your build target. You'll still be able to run your app on older versions, but you must build against the latest version in order to use new features when running on devices with the latest version of Android. Intel or ARM System Images Recommended. The system image is required in order to run the Android Emulator. Each platform version contains the supported system images. You can also download system images later when creating Android Virtual Devices (AVDs) in the AVD Manager. Select either Intel or ARM based on your development computer's processor.

Note: If you plan to use APIs from Google Play services (including Firebase), you must use either the Google APIs system image or the Google Play system image (the latter includes the Play Store app).

The above list is not comprehensive and you can add other sites to download additional packages from third parties.

In some cases, an SDK package may require a specific minimum revision of another tool. If so, the SDK Manager notifies you with a warning and adds the dependencies to your list of downloads.

Tip: You can also customize the build.gradle file so each project uses a specific build chain and compilation options. For more information see, Configuring Gradle Builds.

Edit or add SDK tool sites

To manage which SDK sites Android Studio checks for Android tools and third party tool updates, click the SDK Update Sites tab. You can add other sites that host their own tools, then download the packages from those sites.

For example, a mobile carrier or device manufacturer might offer additional API libraries that are supported by their own Android-powered devices. To develop using their libraries, you can install their Android SDK package by adding their SDK tools URL to the SDK Manager in the SDK Update Sites.

If a carrier or device manufacturer has hosted an SDK add-on repository file on their website, follow these steps to add their site to the Android SDK Manager:

  1. Click the SDK Update Sites tab.
  2. Click Add at the bottom of the window.
  3. Enter the name and URL of the third party site, then click OK.
  4. Make sure the checkbox is selected in the Enabled column.
  5. Click Apply or OK .

Any SDK packages available from the site now appear in the SDK Platforms or SDK Tools tabs, as appropriate.

Auto-download missing packages with Gradle

When you run a build from the command line, Gradle can automatically download missing SDK packages that a project depends on, as long as the corresponding SDK license agreements have already been accepted using the SDK Manager.

When you accept the license agreements using the SDK Manager, Android Studio creates a licenses directory inside the SDK home directory. This licenses directory is necessary for Gradle to auto-download missing packages.

Note: Accepting the license agreements using the android command line tool does not create this licenses directory. You must first accept the agreements using the SDK Manager to be able to use this feature.

If you have accepted the license agreements on one workstation, but wish to build your projects on a different one, you can export your licenses by copying over the accepted licenses directory. To copy the licenses to another machine, follow these steps:

  1. On a machine with Android Studio installed, click Tools > Android > SDK Manager. At the top of the window, note the Android SDK Location.
  2. Navigate to that directory and locate the licenses/ directory inside it. (If you do not see a licenses/ directory, return to Android Studio and update your SDK tools, making sure to accept the license agreements. When you return to the Android SDK home directory, you should now see the directory.)
  3. Copy the entire licenses/ directory and paste it into the Android SDK home directory on the machine where you wish to build your projects.

Gradle will now be able to automatically download missing packages your project depends on.

Note that this feature is automatically disabled for builds you run from Android Studio, as the SDK manager handles downloading missing packages for the IDE. You can also manually disable this feature by setting android.builder.sdkDownload=false in the gradle.properties file for your project.

developer.android.com

SDK Platform Release Notes | Android Studio

  1. Android 7.1 (API level 25)
  2. Android 7.0 (API level 24)
  3. Android 6.0 (API level 23)
  4. Android 5.1 (API level 22)
  5. Android 5.0 (API level 21)
  6. Android 4.4W (API level 20)
  7. Android 4.4 (API level 19)
  8. Android 4.3 (API level 18)
  9. Android 4.2 (API level 17)
  10. Android 4.1 (API level 16)
  11. Android 4.0.3 (API level 15)
  12. Android 4.0 (API level 14)
  13. Android 3.2 (API level 13)
  14. Android 3.1 (API level 12)
  15. Android 3.0 (API level 11)
  16. Android 2.3.3 (API level 10)
  17. Android 2.3 (API level 9)

This page provides release information about the SDK packages available for download from the SDK Manager, in the SDK Platforms tab.

Each SDK Platform version includes the following packages:

  • The Android SDK Platform package. This is required to compile your app for that version.
  • Several System Image packages. At least one of these is required to run that version on the Android Emulator.

    Each platform version includes a system image for each supported form factor (handsets, Android TV, and Android Wear). Each form factor may offer variations to match your computor's processor architecture (such as Intel x86 and ARM EABI). System images labeled Google APIs include access to Google Play services and those labeled Google Play also include Google Play Store.

  • The Sources for Android package. This includes the source files for the platform. Android Studio may show lines of code from these files while you debug your app.

The revision numbers listed below are for the Android SDK Platform package only. The system images may receive separate updates, usually to resolve various bugs with the emulator. There are no release notes for the system images but you should always keep them up to date.

Important: To see the most recent Android system components in the Android SDK Manager, you must first update SDK Tools to the most recent release and restart the SDK Manager.

Android 7.1 (API level 25)

For details about the platform changes, see Android 7.1 for Developers.

Revision 3 (December 2016)

Incremental update. Released as the final Android 7.1.1 (no longer in preview).

Dependencies:

  • Android SDK Platform-Tools 25.0.1 or higher is required.
  • Android SDK Build-Tools 25.0.1 or higher is required.

Revision 2 (November 2016)

Incremental update. Released as Android 7.1.1 Developer Preview 2. For more information, see the Android 7.1 API Overview.

Dependencies:

  • Android SDK Platform-Tools 25.0.1 or higher is required.
  • Android SDK Build-Tools 25.0.1 or higher is required.

Revision 1 (October 2016)

Initial release for Android 7.1 (API level 25). Released as Android 7.1 Developer Preview 1. For more information, see the Android 7.1 API Overview.

Dependencies:

  • Android SDK Platform-Tools 25.0.0 or higher is required.
  • Android SDK Build-Tools 25.0.0 or higher is required.

Android 7.0 (API level 24)

For details about the platform changes, see Android 7.0 for Developers.

Revision 1 (August 2016)

Initial release for Android 7.0 (API level 24). For more information, see the Android 7.0 API Overview.

Dependencies:

  • Android SDK Platform-tools r24 or higher is required.
  • Android SDK Tools 24.0.0 or higher is required.

Android 6.0 (API level 23)

For details about the platform changes, see the Android 6.0 Changes and Android 6.0 APIs.

Revision 2 (November 2015)

Fixed bugs in the layout rendering library used by Android Studio.

Dependencies:

  • Android SDK Platform-tools r23 or higher is required.
  • Android SDK Tools 24.3.4 or higher is required.

Revision 1 (August 2015)

Initial release for Android 6.0 (API level 23). For more information, see the Android 6.0 API Overview.

Dependencies:

  • Android SDK Platform-tools r23 or higher is required.
  • Android SDK Tools 24.3.4 or higher is required.

Android 5.1 (API level 22)

For details about the platform changes, see the Lollipop Overview and Android 5.1 API Changes.

Revision 1 (March 2015)

Initial release for Android 5.1 (API level 22). For more information, see the Android 5.1 API Overview.

Dependencies:

  • Android SDK Platform-tools r22 or higher is required.
  • Android SDK Tools 23.0.5 or higher is required.

Android 5.0 (API level 21)

For details about the platform changes, see the Lollipop Overview and Android 5.0 API Changes.

Revision 2 (December 2014)

Updated layouts in the Support Library and fixed various issues.

Dependencies:

  • Android SDK Platform-tools r21 or higher is required.
  • Android SDK Tools 23.0.5 or higher is required.

Revision 1 (October 2014)

Initial release for Android 5.0 (API level 21). For more information, see the Android 5.0 API Overview.

Dependencies:

  • Android SDK Platform-tools r21 or higher is required.
  • Android SDK Tools 23.0.5 or higher is required.

Android 4.4W (API level 20)

This version makes KitKat available for Android Wear.

Revision 2 (October 2014)

Updated the rendering library.

Dependencies:

  • Android SDK Platform-tools r20 or higher is required.
  • Android SDK Tools 23.0 or higher is required.

Revision 1 (June 2014)

Initial release for Android Wear.

Dependencies:

  • Android SDK Platform-tools r20 or higher is required.
  • Android SDK Tools 23.0 or higher is required.

Android 4.4 (API level 19)

For details about the platform changes, see the KitKat Overview and Android 4.4 API Changes.

Revision 2 (December 2013)

Maintenance release. The system version is 4.4.2. For more information, see the Android 4.4 API Overview.

Dependencies: Android SDK Platform-tools r19 or higher is required. Android SDK Tools 22.3 or higher is recommended.

Revision 1 (October 2013)

Initial release. The system version is 4.4. For more information, see the Android 4.4 API Overview.

Dependencies: Android SDK Platform-tools r19 or higher is required. Android SDK Tools 22.3 or higher is recommended.

Android 4.3 (API level 18)

For details about the platform changes, see the Jelly Bean Overview and Android 4.3 API Changes.

Revision 2 (August 2013)

Maintenance update. The system version is 4.3.

Dependencies: Android SDK Platform-tools r18 or higher is required. Android SDK Tools 22.0.4 or higher is recommended.

Revision 1 (July 2013)

Initial release. The system version is 4.3.

Dependencies: Android SDK Platform-tools r18 or higher is required. Android SDK Tools 22.0.4 or higher is recommended.

Android 4.2 (API level 17)

For details about the platform changes, see the Jelly Bean Overview and Android 4.2 API Changes.

Revision 2 (February 2013)

Maintenance update. The system version is 4.2.2.

Dependencies: SDK Tools r21 or higher is required.

Revision 1 (November 2012)

Initial release. The system version is 4.2.

Dependencies: SDK Tools r20 or higher is required.

Android 4.1 (API level 16)

For details about the platform changes, see the Jelly Bean Overview and Android 4.1 API Changes.

Revision 3 (October 2012)

Maintenance update. The system version is 4.1.2.

Dependencies: SDK Tools r20 or higher is required.

Revision 2 (July 2012)

Maintenance update. The system version is 4.1.1.

Dependencies: SDK Tools r20 or higher is required.

Revision 1 (June 2012)

Initial release. The system version is 4.1.0.

Dependencies: SDK Tools r20 or higher is required.

Android 4.0.3 (API level 15)

Revision 3 (March 2012)

Maintenance update. The system version is 4.0.4.

Note: This system image includes support for emulator hardware graphics acceleration when used with SDK Tools r17 or higher. (more info)

Dependencies: SDK Tools r17 or higher is required.

Revision 2 (January 2012)

Maintenance update. The system version is 4.0.3.

Dependencies: SDK Tools r14 or higher is required.

Revision 1 (December 2011)

Initial release. The system version is 4.0.3.

Dependencies: SDK Tools r14 or higher is required.

Android 4.0 (API level 14)

Android 4.0, Revision 2 (December 2011)

Maintenance update. The system version is 4.0.2.

Dependencies: SDK Tools r14 or higher is required.

Android 4.0, Revision 1 (October 2011)

Initial release. The system version is 4.0.1.

Dependencies: SDK Tools r14 or higher is required.

Android 3.2 (API level 13)

Android 3.2, Revision 1 (July 2011)

Initial release. SDK Tools r12 or higher is recommended.

Android 3.1 (API level 12)

Android 3.1, Revision 3 (July 2011)

Dependencies:

Requires SDK Tools r12 or higher.

Notes:

Improvements to the platform's rendering library to support the visual layout editor in the ADT Eclipse plugin. This revision allows for more drawing features in ADT and fixes several bugs in the previous rendering library. It also unlocks several editor features that were added in ADT 12.

Android 3.1, Revision 2 (May 2011)

Dependencies:

Requires SDK Tools r11 or higher.

Notes:

Fixes an issue with the visual layout editor rendering library that prevented Android 3.1 from running in ADT.

Android 3.1, Revision 1 (May 2011)

Dependencies:

Requires SDK Tools r11 or higher.

Android 3.0 (API level 11)

Android 3.0, Revision 2 (July 2011)

Dependencies:

Requires SDK Tools r12 or higher.

Notes:

Improvements to the platform's rendering library to support the visual layout editor in the ADT Eclipse plugin. This revision allows for more drawing features in ADT and fixes several bugs in the previous rendering library. It also unlocks several editor features that were added in ADT 12.

Android 3.0, Revision 1 (February 2011)

Dependencies:

Requires SDK Tools r10 or higher.

Android 2.3.3 (API level 10)

Android 2.3.3, Revision 2 (July 2011)

Dependencies:

Requires SDK Tools r12 or higher.

Notes:

Improvements to the platform's rendering library to support the visual layout editor in the ADT Eclipse plugin. This revision allows for more drawing features in ADT and fixes several bugs in the previous rendering library. It also unlocks several editor features that were added in ADT 12.

Android 2.3.3, Revision 1 (February 2011)

Dependencies:

Requires SDK Tools r9 or higher.

Android 2.3 (API level 9)

Android 2.3, Revision 1 (December 2010)

Dependencies:

Requires SDK Tools r8 or higher.

developer.android.com

Android SDK | Android Developers

 

Before installing the Android SDK, you must agree to the following terms and conditions.

Terms and Conditions

This is the Android Software Development Kit License Agreement

1. Introduction

1.1 The Android Software Development Kit (referred to in this License Agreement as the "SDK" and specifically including the Android system files, packaged APIs, and Google APIs add-ons) is licensed to you subject to the terms of this License Agreement. This License Agreement forms a legally binding contract between you and Google in relation to your use of the SDK. 1.2 “Android” means the Android software stack for devices, as made available under the Android Open Source Project, which is located at the following URL: http://source.android.com/, as updated from time to time. 1.3 "Google" means Google Inc., a Delaware corporation with principal place of business at 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, United States.

2. Accepting this License Agreement

2.1 In order to use the SDK, you must first agree to this License Agreement. You may not use the SDK if you do not accept this License Agreement. 2.2 By clicking to accept, you hereby agree to the terms of this License Agreement. 2.3 You may not use the SDK and may not accept the License Agreement if you are a person barred from receiving the SDK under the laws of the United States or other countries including the country in which you are resident or from which you use the SDK. 2.4 If you are agreeing to be bound by this License Agreement on behalf of your employer or other entity, you represent and warrant that you have full legal authority to bind your employer or such entity to this License Agreement. If you do not have the requisite authority, you may not accept the License Agreement or use the SDK on behalf of your employer or other entity.

3. SDK License from Google

3.1 Subject to the terms of this License Agreement, Google grants you a limited, worldwide, royalty-free, non-assignable and non-exclusive license to use the SDK solely to develop applications to run on the Android platform. 3.2 You agree that Google or third parties own all legal right, title and interest in and to the SDK, including any Intellectual Property Rights that subsist in the SDK. "Intellectual Property Rights" means any and all rights under patent law, copyright law, trade secret law, trademark law, and any and all other proprietary rights. Google reserves all rights not expressly granted to you. 3.3 You may not use the SDK for any purpose not expressly permitted by this License Agreement. Except to the extent required by applicable third party licenses, you may not: (a) copy (except for backup purposes), modify, adapt, redistribute, decompile, reverse engineer, disassemble, or create derivative works of the SDK or any part of the SDK; or (b) load any part of the SDK onto a mobile handset or any other hardware device except a personal computer, combine any part of the SDK with other software, or distribute any software or device incorporating a part of the SDK. 3.4 You agree that you will not take any actions that may cause or result in the fragmentation of Android, including but not limited to distributing, participating in the creation of, or promoting in any way a software development kit derived from the SDK. 3.5 Use, reproduction and distribution of components of the SDK licensed under an open source software license are governed solely by the terms of that open source software license and not this License Agreement. 3.6 You agree that the form and nature of the SDK that Google provides may change without prior notice to you and that future versions of the SDK may be incompatible with applications developed on previous versions of the SDK. You agree that Google may stop (permanently or temporarily) providing the SDK (or any features within the SDK) to you or to users generally at Google's sole discretion, without prior notice to you. 3.7 Nothing in this License Agreement gives you a right to use any of Google's trade names, trademarks, service marks, logos, domain names, or other distinctive brand features. 3.8 You agree that you will not remove, obscure, or alter any proprietary rights notices (including copyright and trademark notices) that may be affixed to or contained within the SDK.

4. Use of the SDK by You

4.1 Google agrees that it obtains no right, title or interest from you (or your licensors) under this License Agreement in or to any software applications that you develop using the SDK, including any intellectual property rights that subsist in those applications. 4.2 You agree to use the SDK and write applications only for purposes that are permitted by (a) this License Agreement and (b) any applicable law, regulation or generally accepted practices or guidelines in the relevant jurisdictions (including any laws regarding the export of data or software to and from the United States or other relevant countries). 4.3 You agree that if you use the SDK to develop applications for general public users, you will protect the privacy and legal rights of those users. If the users provide you with user names, passwords, or other login information or personal information, you must make the users aware that the information will be available to your application, and you must provide legally adequate privacy notice and protection for those users. If your application stores personal or sensitive information provided by users, it must do so securely. If the user provides your application with Google Account information, your application may only use that information to access the user's Google Account when, and for the limited purposes for which, the user has given you permission to do so. 4.4 You agree that you will not engage in any activity with the SDK, including the development or distribution of an application, that interferes with, disrupts, damages, or accesses in an unauthorized manner the servers, networks, or other properties or services of any third party including, but not limited to, Google or any mobile communications carrier. 4.5 You agree that you are solely responsible for (and that Google has no responsibility to you or to any third party for) any data, content, or resources that you create, transmit or display through Android and/or applications for Android, and for the consequences of your actions (including any loss or damage which Google may suffer) by doing so. 4.6 You agree that you are solely responsible for (and that Google has no responsibility to you or to any third party for) any breach of your obligations under this License Agreement, any applicable third party contract or Terms of Service, or any applicable law or regulation, and for the consequences (including any loss or damage which Google or any third party may suffer) of any such breach.

5. Your Developer Credentials

5.1 You agree that you are responsible for maintaining the confidentiality of any developer credentials that may be issued to you by Google or which you may choose yourself and that you will be solely responsible for all applications that are developed under your developer credentials.

6. Privacy and Information

6.1 In order to continually innovate and improve the SDK, Google may collect certain usage statistics from the software including but not limited to a unique identifier, associated IP address, version number of the software, and information on which tools and/or services in the SDK are being used and how they are being used. Before any of this information is collected, the SDK will notify you and seek your consent. If you withhold consent, the information will not be collected. 6.2 The data collected is examined in the aggregate to improve the SDK and is maintained in accordance with Google's Privacy Policy.

7. Third Party Applications

7.1 If you use the SDK to run applications developed by a third party or that access data, content or resources provided by a third party, you agree that Google is not responsible for those applications, data, content, or resources. You understand that all data, content or resources which you may access through such third party applications are the sole responsibility of the person from which they originated and that Google is not liable for any loss or damage that you may experience as a result of the use or access of any of those third party applications, data, content, or resources. 7.2 You should be aware the data, content, and resources presented to you through such a third party application may be protected by intellectual property rights which are owned by the providers (or by other persons or companies on their behalf). You may not modify, rent, lease, loan, sell, distribute or create derivative works based on these data, content, or resources (either in whole or in part) unless you have been specifically given permission to do so by the relevant owners. 7.3 You acknowledge that your use of such third party applications, data, content, or resources may be subject to separate terms between you and the relevant third party. In that case, this License Agreement does not affect your legal relationship with these third parties.

8. Using Android APIs

8.1 Google Data APIs 8.1.1 If you use any API to retrieve data from Google, you acknowledge that the data may be protected by intellectual property rights which are owned by Google or those parties that provide the data (or by other persons or companies on their behalf). Your use of any such API may be subject to additional Terms of Service. You may not modify, rent, lease, loan, sell, distribute or create derivative works based on this data (either in whole or in part) unless allowed by the relevant Terms of Service. 8.1.2 If you use any API to retrieve a user's data from Google, you acknowledge and agree that you shall retrieve data only with the user's explicit consent and only when, and for the limited purposes for which, the user has given you permission to do so.

9. Terminating this License Agreement

9.1 This License Agreement will continue to apply until terminated by either you or Google as set out below. 9.2 If you want to terminate this License Agreement, you may do so by ceasing your use of the SDK and any relevant developer credentials. 9.3 Google may at any time, terminate this License Agreement with you if: (A) you have breached any provision of this License Agreement; or (B) Google is required to do so by law; or (C) the partner with whom Google offered certain parts of SDK (such as APIs) to you has terminated its relationship with Google or ceased to offer certain parts of the SDK to you; or (D) Google decides to no longer provide the SDK or certain parts of the SDK to users in the country in which you are resident or from which you use the service, or the provision of the SDK or certain SDK services to you by Google is, in Google's sole discretion, no longer commercially viable. 9.4 When this License Agreement comes to an end, all of the legal rights, obligations and liabilities that you and Google have benefited from, been subject to (or which have accrued over time whilst this License Agreement has been in force) or which are expressed to continue indefinitely, shall be unaffected by this cessation, and the provisions of paragraph 14.7 shall continue to apply to such rights, obligations and liabilities indefinitely.

10. DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES

10.1 YOU EXPRESSLY UNDERSTAND AND AGREE THAT YOUR USE OF THE SDK IS AT YOUR SOLE RISK AND THAT THE SDK IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND "AS AVAILABLE" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND FROM GOOGLE. 10.2 YOUR USE OF THE SDK AND ANY MATERIAL DOWNLOADED OR OTHERWISE OBTAINED THROUGH THE USE OF THE SDK IS AT YOUR OWN DISCRETION AND RISK AND YOU ARE SOLELY RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DAMAGE TO YOUR COMPUTER SYSTEM OR OTHER DEVICE OR LOSS OF DATA THAT RESULTS FROM SUCH USE. 10.3 GOOGLE FURTHER EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES AND CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, WHETHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES AND CONDITIONS OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT.

11. LIMITATION OF LIABILITY

11.1 YOU EXPRESSLY UNDERSTAND AND AGREE THAT GOOGLE, ITS SUBSIDIARIES AND AFFILIATES, AND ITS LICENSORS SHALL NOT BE LIABLE TO YOU UNDER ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR EXEMPLARY DAMAGES THAT MAY BE INCURRED BY YOU, INCLUDING ANY LOSS OF DATA, WHETHER OR NOT GOOGLE OR ITS REPRESENTATIVES HAVE BEEN ADVISED OF OR SHOULD HAVE BEEN AWARE OF THE POSSIBILITY OF ANY SUCH LOSSES ARISING.

12. Indemnification

12.1 To the maximum extent permitted by law, you agree to defend, indemnify and hold harmless Google, its affiliates and their respective directors, officers, employees and agents from and against any and all claims, actions, suits or proceedings, as well as any and all losses, liabilities, damages, costs and expenses (including reasonable attorneys fees) arising out of or accruing from (a) your use of the SDK, (b) any application you develop on the SDK that infringes any copyright, trademark, trade secret, trade dress, patent or other intellectual property right of any person or defames any person or violates their rights of publicity or privacy, and (c) any non-compliance by you with this License Agreement.

13. Changes to the License Agreement

13.1 Google may make changes to the License Agreement as it distributes new versions of the SDK. When these changes are made, Google will make a new version of the License Agreement available on the website where the SDK is made available.

14. General Legal Terms

14.1 This License Agreement constitutes the whole legal agreement between you and Google and governs your use of the SDK (excluding any services which Google may provide to you under a separate written agreement), and completely replaces any prior agreements between you and Google in relation to the SDK. 14.2 You agree that if Google does not exercise or enforce any legal right or remedy which is contained in this License Agreement (or which Google has the benefit of under any applicable law), this will not be taken to be a formal waiver of Google's rights and that those rights or remedies will still be available to Google. 14.3 If any court of law, having the jurisdiction to decide on this matter, rules that any provision of this License Agreement is invalid, then that provision will be removed from this License Agreement without affecting the rest of this License Agreement. The remaining provisions of this License Agreement will continue to be valid and enforceable. 14.4 You acknowledge and agree that each member of the group of companies of which Google is the parent shall be third party beneficiaries to this License Agreement and that such other companies shall be entitled to directly enforce, and rely upon, any provision of this License Agreement that confers a benefit on (or rights in favor of) them. Other than this, no other person or company shall be third party beneficiaries to this License Agreement. 14.5 EXPORT RESTRICTIONS. THE SDK IS SUBJECT TO UNITED STATES EXPORT LAWS AND REGULATIONS. YOU MUST COMPLY WITH ALL DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL EXPORT LAWS AND REGULATIONS THAT APPLY TO THE SDK. THESE LAWS INCLUDE RESTRICTIONS ON DESTINATIONS, END USERS AND END USE. 14.6 The rights granted in this License Agreement may not be assigned or transferred by either you or Google without the prior written approval of the other party. Neither you nor Google shall be permitted to delegate their responsibilities or obligations under this License Agreement without the prior written approval of the other party. 14.7 This License Agreement, and your relationship with Google under this License Agreement, shall be governed by the laws of the State of California without regard to its conflict of laws provisions. You and Google agree to submit to the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts located within the county of Santa Clara, California to resolve any legal matter arising from this License Agreement. Notwithstanding this, you agree that Google shall still be allowed to apply for injunctive remedies (or an equivalent type of urgent legal relief) in any jurisdiction. November 13, 2012

Now that you've downloaded the Android SDK, you don't need to return here for SDK updates. The SDK tools allow you to install additional packages and future updates from the SDK Manager.

For instructions about setting up your Android SDK for the first time, read Setting Up the ADT Bundle.

stuff.mit.edu

Getting Started with the SDK Preview

Welcome to the Android Things SDK Preview! Android Things development is very similar to traditional Android mobile development and involves writing apps using the Android framework and tools. All you need is a development board flashed with the Android Things OS and the required peripherals for your device.

This guide gives you all the information you need to get started quickly with a supported board and set up your initial development environment.

Get Familiar with Android Development

If you've never developed an Android app, start by building your first Android mobile app. The basic concepts and general workflow of core Android development transfer over well to Android Things development. If you don't have a mobile device, the Android SDK comes with a software emulator.

See Building Your First App in the Android OS documentation to get started and come back to Android Things when you're ready.

Understand the Android Things Platform

Because Android Things has a few key differences compared to the core Android OS, read the Overview to understand key concepts that you'll need to understand.

Get Hardware

Before you begin, you need a supported development board. You can compare the available boards on the Developer Kits page.

Flash Android Things

Once you select a board, flash and bring up your hardware with the instructions in the Hardware Getting Started guide for your particular board:

Set Up Your Development Environment

  1. Download or update to the latest version of Android Studio.
  2. Open Android Studio and start a new project. In the new project wizard, keep the default settings except for the form factors:
    • Select Android Things as the form factor on which to run your application.
    • Select API 26: Android 8.0 (Oreo).
  3. Connect your board and verify you can access the device via adb:

    $ adb devices List of devices attached 4560736843791520041 device
  4. Deploy the sample project to your board and verify that you can see the activity messages with logcat.

Build your First Device

Now that you have your environment set up, see the Building Your First Device training class to start developing for Android Things.

More samples

For assistance building more complex applications with Android Things, review additional examples in the Samples section.

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This doc is hidden because your selected API level for the documentation is . You can change the documentation API level with the selector above the left navigation.

For more information about specifying the API level your app requires, read Supporting Different Platform Versions.

developer.android.com

Android, the world's most popular mobile platform

Android powers hundreds of millions of mobile devices in more than 190 countries around the world. It's the largest installed base of any mobile platform and growing fast—every day another million users power up their Android devices for the first time and start looking for apps, games, and other digital content.

Android gives you a world-class platform for creating apps and games for Android users everywhere, as well as an open marketplace for distributing to them instantly.

Android growth in device activations

Global partnerships and large installed base

Building on the contributions of the open-source Linux community and more than 300 hardware, software, and carrier partners, Android has rapidly become the fastest-growing mobile OS.

Every day more than 1 million new Android devices are activated worldwide.

Android’s openness has made it a favorite for consumers and developers alike, driving strong growth in app consumption. Android users download more than 1.5 billion apps and games from Google Play each month.

With its partners, Android is continuously pushing the boundaries of hardware and software forward to bring new capabilities to users and developers. For developers, Android innovation lets you build powerful, differentiated applications that use the latest mobile technologies.

Powerful development framework

Easily optimize a single binary for phones, tablets, and other devices.

Android gives you everything you need to build best-in-class app experiences. It gives you a single application model that lets you deploy your apps broadly to hundreds of millions of users across a wide range of devices—from phones to tablets and beyond.

Android also gives you tools for creating apps that look great and take advantage of the hardware capabilities available on each device. It automatically adapts your UI to look its best on each device, while giving you as much control as you want over your UI on different device types.

For example, you can create a single app binary that's optimized for both phone and tablet form factors. You declare your UI in lightweight sets of XML resources, one set for parts of the UI that are common to all form factors and other sets for optimzations specific to phones or tablets. At runtime, Android applies the correct resource sets based on its screen size, density, locale, and so on.

To help you develop efficiently, the Android Developer Tools offer a full Java IDE with advanced features for developing, debugging, and packaging Android apps. Using the IDE, you can develop on any available Android device or create virtual devices that emulate any hardware configuration.

1.5 billion downloads a month and growing. Get your apps in front of millions of users at Google's scale.

Open marketplace for distributing your apps

Google Play is the premier marketplace for selling and distributing Android apps. When you publish an app on Google Play, you reach the huge installed base of Android.

As an open marketplace, Google Play puts you in control of how you sell your products. You can publish whenever you want, as often as you want, and to the customers you want. You can distribute broadly to all markets and devices or focus on specific segments, devices, or ranges of hardware capabilities.

You can monetize in the way that works best for your business—priced or free, with in-app products or subscriptions—for highest engagement and revenues. You also have complete control of the pricing for your apps and in-app products and can set or change prices in any supported currency at any time.

Beyond growing your customer base, Google Play helps you build visibility and engagement across your apps and brand. As your apps rise in popularity, Google Play gives them higher placement in weekly "top" charts and rankings, and for the best apps promotional slots in curated collections.

Preinstalled on hundreds of millions of Android devices around the world, Google Play can be a growth engine for your business.

GET STARTED

developer.android.com

Start Integrating Google Sign-In into Your Android App  |  Google Sign-In for Android  |  Google Developers

Before you can start integrating Google Sign-In in your own app, you must configure a Google API Console project and set up your Android Studio project. The steps on this page do just that. The next steps then describe how to integrate Google Sign-In into your app.

Prerequisites

Google Sign-In for Android has the following requirements:

  • A compatible Android device that runs Android 2.3 or newer and includes the Google Play Store or an emulator with an AVD that runs the Google APIs platform based on Android 4.2.2 or newer and has Google Play Services version 9.8.0 or newer.
  • The latest version of the Android SDK, including the SDK Tools component. The SDK is available from the Android SDK Manager in Android Studio.
  • A project configured to compile against Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) or newer.
  • The Google Play Services SDK:
    1. In Android Studio, select Tools > Android > SDK Manager.
    2. Scroll to the bottom of the package list and select Extras > Google Repository. The package is downloaded to your computer and installed in your SDK environment at android-sdk-folder/extras/google/google_play_services.

This guide is written for users of Android Studio, which is the recommended development environment.

Get a configuration file

Click the button below to get a configuration file to add to your project.

The configuration file provides service-specific information for your app. To get it, you must select an existing project for your app or create a new one. You'll also need to provide a package name for your app.

When you generate the configuration file, you will also need to provide the SHA-1 hash of your signing certificate. See Authenticating Your Client for information.

Get a Configuration File

Add the configuration file to your project

Copy the google-services.json file you just downloaded into the app/ or mobile/ directory of your Android Studio project. Open the Android Studio Terminal pane:

Mac/Linux$ mv path-to-download/google-services.json app/ Windows$ move path-to-download/google-services.json app/ Note: If you enabled only Google Sign-In when you generated the configuration file, you can skip this step. Google Sign-In does not require the configuration file to be included in your project—generating the file performs the neecessary configuration steps.

Add the Google Services plugin

The Google Services plugin for Gradle parses configuration information from the google-services.json file. Add the plugin to your project by updating your top-level build.gradle and your app-level build.gradle files as follows:

  1. Add the dependency to your project-level build.gradle: classpath 'com.google.gms:google-services:3.0.0'
  2. Add the plugin to your app-level build.gradle: apply plugin: 'com.google.gms.google-services'

Add Google Play Services

In your app-level build.gradle file, declare Google Play Services as a dependency:

apply plugin: 'com.android.application' ... dependencies { compile 'com.google.android.gms:play-services-auth:9.8.0' }

Get your backend server's OAuth 2.0 client ID

If your app authenticates with a backend server or accesses Google APIs from your backend server, you must get the OAuth 2.0 client ID that was created for your server. To find the OAuth 2.0 client ID:

  1. Open the Credentials page in the API Console.
  2. The Web application type client ID is your backend server's OAuth 2.0 client ID.
Note: If you haven't recently created a new Android client, you might not have a Web application type client ID. You can create one by opening the Credentials page and clicking New credentials > OAuth client ID.

Pass this client ID to the requestIdToken or requestServerAuthCode method when you create the GoogleSignInOptions object.

Next steps

Now that you have configured a Google API Console project and set up your Android Studio project, you can integrate Google Sign-In into your app.

developers.google.com


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